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Water Heaters

Hot Water Comes Out Cloudy

What Does It Mean When Hot Water Comes Out Cloudy?

By Water Heaters

There’s nothing like pouring a nice clear glass of water, but what if the water is not as clear as you’d hoped? Cloudy water is not an uncommon occurrence, especially if it’s hot water. 

Since it’s the hot water that’s mainly affected, you may blame the water heater first, and although the water heater may be to blame, there are also other possibilities. Read on to find out what causes cloudy water and some simple ways to fix it.

What Causes Cloudy Water?

Water molecules consist of hydrogen and oxygen. When heated, they expand. During expansion, other molecules and smaller particles are trapped, which causes the water to look cloudy. Essentially, bubbles created during the expansion are what cause the cloudy look. So why doesn’t the water always look cloudy? Pressure.

The buildup – and sudden release – of pressure is what causes the separation of molecules, which in turn creates bubbles. Note that air bubbles created this way are not the same thing as air in your hot water lines. Also, pressure isn’t the only culprit. 

Here are some common causes:

Dirty Aerator

The aerator is found at the tip of the faucet. You can usually twist it off easily. When sediment builds up and blocks the path of flowing water, it creates unwanted pressure. This pressure creates more bubbles and makes the cloudy look in the water.

Sediment Buildup in the Water Heater

Sediment will build up in your water heater, and the only way to limit this is by flushing the hot water heater or using a water filtration system. Sediment gathers on the anode – or element – and limits its potential. 

Eventually, the sediment flakes off and settles to the bottom of your water heater. It continues to accumulate over the years until it’s flushed or it eats through the bottom of your water heater.

Heating Up the Water

Heating the water will likely produce cloudiness. If you look into a pot of water on the stove, you’ll see it cloud over from the bubbles. Depending on how hot you have your hot water heater set, it could produce the same effect from your faucet.

The Rare Winter Effect

It’s not common, but water on the verge of freezing can cause cloudiness. There aren’t many freezing days in Plano, but it does happen. If you look at the cloudiness in a piece of ice, you can see the effect cold has on water. Cloudiness in cold water may be a sign of something serious or that you need to insulate your pipes better.

Outside Sources

You may not have cloudy water, but instead, it may look tinted or even muddy. If your municipality is doing work to the outside pipes, there is a chance you may get some ugly-looking water, but it shouldn’t last for more than a couple of hours. 

If you notice irregularities after heavy rain, then there may be something wrong with your pipes, and you should call a professional plumber immediately.

How to Determine if Your Cloudy Water Is a Concern

Cloudy water could be nothing, but it could also be serious. Luckily, there is a simple method to determine whether your cloudy water is a concern.

  1. Get a see-through container. This container can be a glass, bowl, or Mason jar.
  2. Turn on your water till it’s hot.
  3. Fill the container to at least three-quarters of the way full.
  4. Set the container on a flat surface and watch it.

Air is lighter than water and will rise to the top. If the cloudiness is primarily air, you will notice the bottom of the container clears, and the rest of the container will be void of cloudiness within a couple of minutes.

Sediment is heavier than water and will settle to the bottom of the container. With sediment, the top of the container will clear first. It will also take much longer for the container to clear since the hot water makes it difficult for the sediment to reach the bottom.

How You Can Fix Cloudy Water in Your Plano Home

Though it’s easy to blame the water heater, it’s actually the aerator that’s to blame in many cases. One of the simplest ways to find out and possibly even fix the problem is by removing and cleaning the aerator. To do this: 

Remove The Aerator From The Faucet

The aerator should unscrew from the faucet by turning clockwise. You may need to use a wrench if it won’t come off easily using your hands. If you can’t remove it by hand, it’s best to contact a professional plumber, as they can remove it without causing damage. 

Clean The Aerator

After you’ve removed the aerator, give it a thorough visual inspection for any dirt and debris that may be caked onto it. Use a washcloth to remove the loose gunk.

There are small mesh holes inside the aerator where sediment deposits can get lodged. Use a toothpick, paper clip, or small needle to dig them out. If they aren’t coming out easily, or you want to be thorough, soak the aerator in white vinegar overnight to loosen the debris. 

Rinse It Out

Once the aerator is cleaned out, give it a good rinsing before placing it back onto the faucet. Hold the aerator under running water to rinse away any lingering debris that became loosened and may be trapped within it. 

Replace The Aerator

When it’s clean and all ready to go, simply screw the aerator counterclockwise back onto the faucet using your hands to get it as tight as it will go. 

Test The Water

It’s time to see if your efforts paid off. Turn on the hot water and allow it to run for a minute to see if the water is still cloudy. If it is, it means there’s a bigger issue at hand, likely something to do with your hot water heater. A plumbing professional will need to come in and inspect the hot water heater to help diagnose the problem. 

Plano’s Plumbing Experts 

Tired of dealing with cloudy water in your Plano, TX, home? The plumbing specialists at Sirius Plumbing and Air Conditioning are standing by, ready to take your call.

With a “Fixed Right and Left Better Than We Found it Guarantee” and a “100% money-back guarantee on all heating, plumbing, and air conditioning issues, you can trust that the job will be handled right the first time, every time. Contact us today to learn more or to schedule an appointment!

Tankless Water Heaters

A Buyer’s Guide: Tankless Water Heaters

By Tankless Water Heaters

There’s no doubt about it; tankless water heaters are becoming more popular in homes every day. Running out of hot water will never be a problem with a compact, ultra-efficient tankless water heater that heats water as you need it.

With as many benefits as they come with, tankless water heaters can be a significant investment, so it’s important to be informed before you buy.

How Do Tankless Water Heaters Work?

Tankless water heaters use an electric element or gas burner to warm the water as it travels through the unit. This design means that the heater is only heating the water that you are signaling you need through your faucets and showerheads.

Unlike traditional water heaters, the hot water is not stored in the tank, so there is far less waste and no risk of running out of hot water.

The Pros and Cons of Tankless Water Heaters

Tankless water heaters offer lots of benefits to homeowners in Carrollton, like energy efficiency and an unlimited hot water supply. However, they do come with some downsides, including upfront costs and sensitivity.

Pro: Space

Tankless water heaters are significantly smaller than traditional water heaters. They are compact and can fit in more spaces in your home, like in the attic. With conventional water heaters, the tank size can be a real problem and can leave you with only a couple of location options. This problem is solved with tankless water heaters.

Pro: Instant Hot Water

If you’ve used a traditional water heater, you know that it can take a while for the water to get warm. With a tankless water heater, once the cold water is flushed from the pipes, you’ll get hot water almost instantly. Not only does this save you time, but it saves a significant amount of water.

Pro: Lifespan

A major advantage of tankless units is their lifespan. The average tankless water heater will last 20 years. Compare this to a high-quality traditional water heater which only lasts about 10.

While it can be tempting to save costs upfront by installing a traditional heater, you should seriously consider the long-term savings that come with the long lifespan of a tankless heater.

Pro: Energy Efficiency

Old water heaters are not known for efficiency. In fact, they can be downright wasteful.

Traditional heaters fill up a large tank with water then use energy 24/7 to make sure you have hot water on demand. Because tankless water heaters heat on demand, they are as much as 25% more efficient than standard models. Not only is the energy efficiency more environmentally friendly, but it will result in savings in your monthly energy bill. 

Pro: Safety

If a traditional water heater leaks, it will spill gallons of water which can easily flood a basement. Tankless water heaters are less prone to leaks, and there is far less water when they do happen.

Additionally, tankless water heaters are installed with the air supply and exhaust vents sealed. This approach means that carbon monoxide can’t leak into your house, a safety feature that you won’t have with traditional water heaters.

Pro: Easy to Winterize

If you are the owner of a vacation home in the Carrollton area, a tankless water heater can offer significant convenience when it comes to winterizing your home. It takes a big-time investment to drain a traditional water heater before locking up for the winter. With a tankless water heater, you can drain it in just a few seconds, then unplug it. 

Con: Trouble Keeping Up

Tankless water heaters can supply an unlimited stream of hot water to a faucet, but they may have trouble keeping up with multiple hot water demands at once. For example, if someone in the home is running the dishwasher while another is taking a shower, a tankless water heater may have trouble keeping up.

Compare this with a traditional water heater that can store up to 80 gallons of hot water at once and easily provide hot water to multiple outlets.

Con: Ongoing Maintenance

While any water heating system will require maintenance, tankless water heaters often require slightly more maintenance than a traditional hot water system. To keep the manufacturer warranty valid, homeowners should perform annual maintenance and, in some cases, may be required to install a water softener.

It is also a good idea for owners to flush out their systems every year. Flushing the system prevents mineral build-up in the water line or the heater itself. There are costs associated with this maintenance, so it is something to factor into your overall budget. 

Con: Higher Upfront Cost

No matter what water heating system you choose, the installation process can be a significant investment in your home. Tankless water heaters are almost always more expensive than traditional systems.

Additionally, the labor required to install tankless water heaters is also higher than for traditional systems. While the energy savings and longer lifespan usually offset these costs, the upfront expense is certainly something to consider. 

Con: Inconsistent Temperatures

Even though traditional water heaters are inefficient, they are consistent. You can expect the same temperature every time you adjust your faucet to the same setting. Tankless water heaters have historically not had the same performance when it comes to consistency.

Consumers have complained about inconsistent water temperatures, which is likely the result of the limitations of sending hot water to multiple locations.

Another thing to be aware of is the tankless water heater may not always come on if enough water isn’t flowing. For example, if the faucet is only slightly open, the tankless water heater may not start heating the water, so the water will never warm up.

Conclusion

Each homeowner’s situation is different, and a tankless water heater may make more sense for some families than others. Before making this investment, make sure you consider all of the factors to make the right decision for you.

If you are ready to move forward with your tankless water heater installation in Carrollton, trust Sirius Plumbing and Air Conditioning. We have over two decades of experience in the industry, and we treat our customers like family. Contact us today.

How to Prevent Rust on Your Water Heater

How to Prevent Rust on Your Water Heater

By Water Heaters

A rusty water heater can equal major problems for your home. Rusty heaters are more prone to leaks, and no one wants to take a shower with rusty water coming from the showerhead. Fortunately, there are many ways to prevent rust on your water heater.

For ideas on better maintaining your water heater, this article will look at five tips to help you keep rust at bay.

Inspect the Anode Rod

One of the most important water heater services that a professional can provide for you is an annual inspection of your anode rod. This rod is located inside the water tank, away from view for the average homeowner. This important component is responsible for drawing out all of the sediment and minerals in the water.

Of course, these particles still affect your water heater. They will eventually erode the anode rod instead of your tank. As the anode rod begins to deteriorate, these other particles are more likely to cause corrosion to the inside lining of your water heater.

Annually inspecting this piece ensures that it is in proper working order. It may even need to be replaced yearly, depending on the water quality in your home.

Flushing the Tank

No matter what type of water you have, chances are that some of it will be filled with sediment. As these particles enter the water heater, they will eventually settle on the bottom of the tank. Sediment combined with water is likely to lead to rust on the inside of your heater.

Wellwater or other sources of hard water can cause this issue to occur much faster. This type of water often contains iron, leading to rusty standing water at the bottom of the tank. If left untreated for too long, it will compromise the entire water heater.

 You will need to flush this sediment out regularly. It is recommended to call professionals at least once a year for this water heater service in Frisco. If you have many people in the home, you may even want to do this twice a year or quarterly.

Eliminate Standing Water

Most homeowners already know that standing water is a major issue for almost any appliance. Even though your water heater handles hundreds of gallons daily, standing water can still spell trouble. A unit that has been exposed to any type of standing water must be inspected regularly for corrosion.

While many of the top tips for maintenance and water heater repair relate to the inside of the unit, standing water spells problems for the unit’s exterior. Rust on the outside of the heater is a sure sign that it may be time to look into a newer model.

Be Mindful of Location for Water Heater Service

Where is your water heater located? You should always be mindful of the location of your unit and the role that it can play in developing rust. Some areas of the home, including the basement, will be more prone to moisture than others. In turn, this can lead to premature rusting all around the unit.

If your unit is located in an area with high moisture levels, you should always opt for regular professional water heater maintenance. You should have someone come out and inspect it for potential damages at least once a year.

New Water Heater Installation

A rusty water heater is a potential hazard for your home. As the metal begins to rust and break down, all parts of the heater get significantly weaker. They are more prone to develop leaks and cracks that can cause serious damage to your home.

When you notice rust or rusty water starts coming from your faucets, it may be time to consider replacing your unit. Most water heaters will last anywhere from 6 to 13 years. If your heater is older than this, it may be time to talk to the professionals about a new water heater installation instead of a major repair.

Here are a few signs that it may be time to replace your water heater:

  • Old age (typically above the ten-year mark)
  • Strange noises like banging or rumbling
  • Rusty water
  • Insufficient hot water
  • Standing water around the water heater

If you are paying careful attention, you should quickly spot the signs of something wrong with your water heater.

A new water heater installation can be a great way to lower your monthly bills, as modern units can be far more energy-efficient.

Rusty Water Heaters and Professional Help

Make sure to give the professionals a call to see what they recommend for your specific unit. They might repair it with an anode rod replacement, or you may need a whole new heater. If you need water heater maintenance or repair, Sirius Plumbing and Air Conditioning in Frisco can help. Contact us today to schedule your service!

Properly Sizing Your New Water Heater

Properly Sizing Your New Water Heater in Carrollton

By Water Heaters

Is the water heater in your Carrollton home on its last leg? Have you started planning for a new water heater installation? Are you ready to upgrade your water heater to save money and improve access to hot water?

If the answer is yes, then you will need to ensure your new water heater is the appropriate size for your Carrollton residence. Failing to install a water heater that’s the right size for your home will cost you hundreds in wasted energy and have you dealing with frequent cold showers.

The experts at Sirius Plumbing and Air Conditioning are here to help. We have created this simple guide that outlines everything you need to know about water heater sizing. Read on to learn how to properly size your new water heater.

How Is a Water Heater Sized?

Before you can find the size of water heater you need for your Carrollton home, it’s important to understand how water heaters are classified in the first place. Sizing methods do vary depending on the type of water heater you’re installing.

If you are shopping for a traditional tank storage heater, then the first hour rating (i.e. the number of gallons of hot water the heater can supply per hour) and overall size are most important. The amount of water that the tank can store is denoted in gallons. As you might have guessed, larger households need a tank with a higher capacity. Generally, you can assume you’ll need 10-12 gallons per person on a regular basis.

In terms of the first hour rating, two tanks with the same storage capacity can have different first hour ratings. If multiple people in your household all need to shower at about the same time, opt for the tank with a higher FHR to ensure that everyone has plenty of hot water.

Tankless heaters are a bit simpler to size. For these devices, size is based on GPM, or gallons per minute. The larger your household, the more GPM you will need.

The Importance of Proper Water Heater Sizing

As you can see, buying a water heater that’s the right size for your needs and home is relatively simple once you understand how they are sized. However, many homeowners still make the mistake of buying the wrong size water heater for their Carrollton homes. This occurs when people underestimate their hot water usage or opt for a lower FHR.

The biggest downfall of having an undersized tank water heater is that there will not be enough hot water to go around. This is far from the only problem, though. An undersized water heater will be pulling extra duty trying to keep up with the household demands for hot water. This can shorten the life of your unit and require frequent water heater repairs.

Having an undersized tankless water heater can cause even more headaches. While it will be able to consistently produce hot water, its flow rate will be diminished. Your normally roaring stream of hot water may be reduced to a trickle if your tankless system is too small. This can make simple tasks like washing your hair or cleaning dishes incredibly tedious.

Can I Just Buy an Oversized Water Heater?

In light of all the problems that come with an undersized heater, you’re probably considering a gigantic water heater that far exceeds your needs, right? While you will never experience a hot water shortage if you have an oversized heater, you will experience plenty of other issues.

If you buy an oversized tank storage water heater, it will warm way more water than you need. Even if you have an appropriately sized tank storage water heater, these systems are among the most energy draining in your home. If you intentionally install an oversized unit, expect your energy bill to skyrocket.

Not only will you lose money in the long run, but your upfront cost will be higher. Larger models are notably more expensive. The best approach is to simply find the perfect size hot water heater for your Carrollton home.

Benefits of a New Water Heater

If you take the time to properly size your new water heater, it will pay dividends for years to come. There are many benefits to a new, high-quality water heater that fits your home perfectly. They include:

Improved Energy Efficiency

As water heaters age, they become less efficient. A new, modern water heater will significantly improve your home’s energy efficiency, which will save you money. Who doesn’t want to reduce their monthly utility bill?

If you really want to up the ante, consider a tankless water heater. While these units are more expensive to install, they last longer than tank storage heaters. They do not store water but instead produce it when you turn on the faucet. Since they are not constantly reheating a huge tank of water, they use less energy.

No More Cold Showers

Put a stop to cold showers and hot water shortages with a new water heater installation. Your updated unit will provide plenty of hot water for every member of your household— as long as you get the right size, of course. Your hot water heater is a great investment that will pay for itself many times over and produce the right amount of hot water at the right rate.

Is Water Heater Installation a DIY Project?

Sizing your water heater can definitely be a DIY task, but what about the installation itself? While many home projects can be handled by the weekend warrior with a garage full of power tools, water heater installation should absolutely be left to the pros.

Your home’s hot water heater uses either high-voltage electrical lines or a natural gas supply to operate. No matter which type of water heater is installed in your home, handling these devices without professional training can be dangerous. A single misstep could result in electric shock or a potentially fatal gas leak.

Skip the DIY approach and contact a licensed plumbing contractor, like Sirius Plumbing and Air Conditioning, for your Carrollton hot water heater installation.

Plumbers Near Me

Are you ready to upgrade your hot water heater? If so, then Sirius Plumbing and Air Conditioning is the team for the job. For years, we have served the Dallas-Fort Worth area with great pride. We have recently expanded and are glad to announce that our services are now available to Carrollton residents.

Our team offers free estimates on all installations and can get to work fast. We will ensure that you find the perfect size water heater for your home. Contact us today to get started!

Benefits of a Tankless Water Heater

Three Surprising Benefits of a Tankless Water Heater in Frisco

By Tankless Water Heaters

Living in Frisco with its snowy winters, you may have experienced the trouble of losing hot water right when you need it. If you have a tank-based water heater you’re given a certain volume of heated water that, once gone, needs time to replenish itself. This will take anywhere between forty minutes to over an hour, depending on the model.

You may have heard through research or word of mouth that tankless, or “on-demand” water heaters can provide an unlimited supply of hot water, assuming you stay below the maximum flow rate. This is good news for the leisurely shower-takers in your household, but a tankless water heater comes with other perks as well.

Keep reading to learn of three surprising benefits that come with making the switch to a tankless water heater.

Penny Spent, Penny Saved

Shopping around for tankless water heaters, you may notice that they’re considerably more expensive than tank-based models. There are reasons for this that we’ll get into next, but rest assured this price tag will pay for itself in time.

Energy Efficiency

The U.S. Department of Energy has shown that tankless water heaters are anywhere between 8-50% more efficient than other alternatives, depending on use. And while tank-based heaters are heating water 24/7, even if you’re not using it, a tankless water heater heats as needed. This means it negates the cost of energy other heaters would’ve been wasting.

This is seen most remarkably in smaller homes or ones that use less than 41 gallons of water per day, but even in more water-dependent households the savings are noticeable. According to Energy Star, you have the potential to make back the money spent on a tankless heater well within its lifespan.

Other Savings

Another way you can make back installation cost is to take advantage of the federal tax advantages that come with installing such an energy-efficient appliance. Currently, the federal government is offering a 10% tax credit towards the cost and installation of a tankless water heater. That’s money back in your pocket, and an eco-friendly supply of hot water for your household.

Big Life in a Small Space

The main reason why tankless water heaters are more expensive than the tank-based models is because of their lifespan. While even the most high-quality traditional water heater will last about a decade, a tankless model boasts a lifespan double that.

Warranty Wellness

For an appliance that lasts as long as your average tankless water heater, you want a security plan that can accommodate it. Most traditional, gas or electric tank-heaters have a warranty of about five or six years. This leaves a stretch of time before you need to think about replacing it where, if something goes wrong, you’ll have to pay to fix it out-of-pocket.

Compare this to a tankless water heater, which comes with a warranty that can last up to twenty years – roughly the entire lifespan of the appliance itself. As long as you take the necessary steps to keep this warranty vaid, meaning performing annual maintenance that you should be doing anyway, your tankless heater is covered until it’s time to replace it.

Saving Space

If you were to arrange a boxing match between a tankless and a tank-style heater, it’s undeniable that the tanked heater would win. We’ll admit it. Coming in at 150 pounds and over four feet tall, this 40-gallon behemoth would take down a tankless water heater in a cagematch almost immediately.

But when it comes to inviting these two options into your home, you might not have the room to accommodate a tank-based water heater. If that’s the case, a tankless model may be more appealing. Unlike their older sibling, they’re a little over two feet tall and weigh about as much as a Boston Terrier.

And while they aren’t as cute as a terrier, they’ll definitely stay in one place, mounted to the wall where they’ll take up little room, and are guaranteed not to pee on your rug.

Staying Safe

After enough time with a tank-based water heater, accumulating build-up within the tank is inevitable. When this happens, it isn’t long before the tank will corrode and eventually leak, which can cause water damage and even risk of flooding if the leak is strong enough.

Of course, since a tankless water heater doesn’t have a tank, you negate a lot of these risks, and while a leak is possible with regular maintenance it’s not likely. And, beyond leaks, ditching the tank also provides a level of safety for the worst-case scenarios.

Bursting Tanks and Tainted Water

Tank-style heaters, in accordance with current code, come with a temp and pressure relief valve that works to eliminate the risk of the tank exploding. This is an awful thing to consider, and it’s fairly rare, but the chances of this happening increase as minerals and other build-up clog the valve.

If you don’t have a tank, this won’t be a problem. Getting rid of the tank also allows more precise control over the heat of the water that you use, preventing possible incidental burns. It also ensures that the contaminants that build up over time in a tanked system don’t travel into your water lines and expose your households to toxins.

Choosing a Tankless Water Heater for your Frisco Home

There are many arguments towards switching to a tankless water heater. They don’t work with a pilot light, and because of that are less likely to overheat and build up pressure over time. And they’re easy to store in even the smallest homes, with a size and weight that’ll fit nicely in most closets.

Ultimately, when choosing between a tank versus tankless water heater for your Frisco home, you want to take into consideration the size of your household and the amount of water that you use. More than that, you should think about if a tankless heater will fit in your lifestyle.

Can you keep up with maintenance? Are you tech savvy enough to take advantage of a tankless water heater’s Wi-Fi compatibility? If the answer to questions like these is yes, a tankless water heater may fit well for you.

Get to Know Your Water Heater

By Gas Water Heaters, Plumbing and Air Conditioning Dallas TX, Tankless Water Heaters, Water Heaters

The ins and outs of a workhorse appliance you rely on every day. Dallas TX

A water heater is the kind of appliance that we don’t like to think about… as long as it works.

A tank water heater will last 6-15 years, depending on the quality of the appliance and your water. Take some time to get to know the mechanics of yours and you can prolong that lifespan — and prevent the dreaded “blow out” we’ve all heard horror stories about.

AN INSIDE LOOK AT YOUR WATER HEATER

First, you need to know that there are two kinds of water heaters: tank and tankless. They may be either powered by gas or electricity.

All about the tank hot water heater. This American household staple has been around for a long time. It is the most common type. In essence, this appliance consists of a large holding tank where water is heated and then distributed to the rest of the house.

All about tankless hot water heaters. We actually talk a lot about this baby at Sirius Plumbing and AIr Conditioning because we love them! Read more here.

About gas powered water heaters. There’s not much of a difference between gas and electric in modern hot water heaters. Be aware, however, that if you smell gas around the unit, shut the gas off immediately via the shut off valve on the gas line.

You’d better know: where the main switch valve is. If you learn nothing else from this nitty gritty cross section of a water heater, let it be the exact location of the main valve that supplies water to the appliance. You will not want to be guessing when an emergency arises. To identify the input pipe, put your hand on it. Is it cold? That’s your intake.

You’d better know: where the pressure relief valve is. This guy has one job and it’s to keep the water tank from a blow out when too much pressure builds in the tank. Keep your eye out for any signs of water on the floor, which could be a sign of appliance malfunction.

You’d better know: where the drain valve is. If you need to replace or repair your hot water heater, or you need to drain it to maintain it, the drain valve is where it all happens. Near the bottom of the tank, you can open up a faucet about the size of a garden hose to empty the tank.

You’d better know: how to use the temperature control knob. Relight the pilot light, if need be, on the gas powered water heater. This knob also controls the temperature of the water as supplied to the house. CAUTION: a high setting can create scalding hot water from the taps, please exercise restraint when turning it up. Conserve energy by turning it down.

Now that you know the basic components of your water heater, you can prevent any unnecessary heartache and expense.

#protip Drain the water on a regular basis to flush out any built up contaminants and prevent corrosion. Do this by attaching a regular old garden hose and feed it into a 5gal bucket. CAUTION! The water is hot. (Hold on to that hose and elevate it before you disconnect it or you’ll need a mop!)

#protip Do a regular visual inspection of the unit. Look for signs of corrosion on the top and bottom. Make sure the ventilation pipe is secure.

#protip Your future self will thank you for spending less than $20 on a Water Alarm. This small device will deliver a piercing alarm heard throughout the whole house when it senses water on the floor.

Is your hot water heater leaking? Watch this video to find out what to do next.
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Sirius Plumbing and Air Conditioning services Dallas/Ft Worth or any one of these mid cities:

Dallas, Plano, Carrollton, Richardson, Garland, Allen, Frisco, McKinney, Lewisville, Flower Mound, Coppell, University Park, Highland Park, Fort Worth, Richland Hills, North Richland Hills, Hurst, Bedford, Euless, Colleyville, Keller, Southlake, Grapevine, Trophy Club, and surrounding DFW communities.

We are committed to helping treating our customers like family. We make sure that we’re there for them when they need plumbing repairs, air conditioning repair, and hot water heater repair. We also help when people have a leaking toilet, clogged drain, or gas line repair. What’s more, we do tankless water heater installation and HVAC replacement. Get to know us better at siriuspac.com/about/.